Assignment discovery carbon dating artifacts

Rated 3.82/5 based on 564 customer reviews

The findings, based on soil samples taken from under a seven-meter thick walled tower, shave nearly a thousand years from previous archaeological dating of the structure, which placed it c.1700 BCE — and contradict a presumed biblical linkage to the site.Since 2012, the IAA has performed excavations along the outer, eastern face of the Spring Tower, part of the citadel. Joe Uziel and Nahshon Szanton observed that the tower does not sit on bedrock but rather on layers of soil, according to the recent study, published June 6 through Cambridge University Press.The discovery of these organically based sediment layers opened up the possibility of analyzing the soil through radiocarbon dating, rather than a dating based on the shapes and materials of discovered artifacts that was previously performed.Downhill from the Temple Mount of Jerusalem, the Gihon Spring guard tower was discovered in 2004 by archaeologists Ronny Reich and Eli Shukron.Based on pottery and architectural signifiers, the heavily fortified structure — and the rest of the Spring Citadel protecting Jerusalem’s precious water source — were dated to Canaanite construction (Middle Bronze II period).

assignment discovery carbon dating artifacts-63

However, new findings by an interdisciplinary cooperative team of Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologists and Weizmann Institute scientists place the construction of the tower during the second half of the Iron Age — smack dab in the middle of the Israelite period, and much closer to the days of Herod than earlier suspected.As part of ongoing cooperative research projects with the IAA, Dr.Elisabetta Boaretto, head of the Weizmann Institute of Science’s D-REAMS Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory and track leader within the Max Planck-Weizmann Center for Integrative Archaeology and Anthropology, was on the forefront of the radiocarbon dating analysis.The radiocarbon dates only mean that this could not have been done before the late 9th century. “In any event, a late 9th century date should come as no surprise, as there are other indications for the growth of the city at that time – from the Temple Mount (in my opinion the original location of the mound of Jerusalem) to the south, in the direction of the Gihon spring,” says Finkelstein."Archaeology is the science of rubbish." -archaeologist Stuart Piggot The Forma Urbis Romae may just be the world's biggest jigsaw-puzzle.

Leave a Reply