Dating a borderline personality disorder

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People who have a first-degree relative with BPD are five times more likely to develop BPD themselves.

Research has shown brain changes in the ability to regulate emotions. Unlike narcissists, who often avoid therapy, borderlines usually welcome it; however, before recent treatment innovations, its effectiveness had been questioned.

A codependent or narcissist who acts self-sufficient and controls his or her feelings can provide a perfect match.

The borderline’s partner vicariously comes alive through the melodrama provided by BPD.

You’re seen as either for or against them and must take their side.The person with BPD may appear to be the underdog in the relationship, while his or her partner is the steady, needless and caretaking top dog. A codependent who also yearns for love and fears abandonment can become the perfect caretaker for someone with BPD (whom they sense won’t leave).In fact, both are codependent and it’s hard for either of them to leave. The codependent is easily seduced and carried away by romance and the person with BPD’s extreme openness and vulnerability.Unlike bipolar disorder, their moods shift quickly and aren’t a departure from their normal self. Their emotions, behavior, and unstable relationships, including work history, reflect a fragile, shame-based self-image.This is often marked by sudden shifts, sometimes to the extent that they feel nonexistent. Thus, they’re dependent on others and may frequently seek advice from several people about the same question on the same day.

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